9
genes

The Skin Care Report

Our skin care report analyzes nine genes that can affect three main components of your skin – antioxidant, elasticity, and hydration. Skin care usually takes the “one-size fits” all approach with treating individuals who are all different. The only sure way to effectively treat your skin is by knowing your own genetic make-up. Once you receive your DNA4Life skin care report, you will have a more scientific and accurate approach to your skin care, and you will finally be able to eliminate the guesswork in treating your skin.

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Antioxidant + Genes

NQO1

NAD(P)H dehydrogenase [quinone] 1 is the enzyme encoded by the gene, NQO1, that generates and maintains the active form of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in mitochondrial membrane systems and liposomes, thereby promoting CoQ10’s antioxidant activity. CoQ10 is an antioxidant made in the human body that is needed for basic cell function. CoQ10 levels decrease with age. CoQ10 has been also identified as a modulator of gene expression, inflammatory processes, and programmed cell death (apoptosis).

SOD2

Superoxide Dismutase II (SOD2) is the enzyme encoded by the gene, SOD2, and converts superoxide, an extremely toxic byproduct of cellular respiration, into hydrogen peroxide and oxygen gas. The hydrogen peroxide is further broken down into water. These actions of SOD2 reduce free-radicals and provide protection against cell death, oxidative stress, ionizing radiation, and inflammation.

NFE2L2

Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is encoded by the gene, NFE2L2. Under non-stressful conditions, Nrf2 is regulated by proteins in the cell that degrade it quickly. Under oxidative stress, Nrf2 is not destroyed and migrates to the cell nucleus and binds to DNA. This binding of Nrf2 to promoter DNA initiates transcription of antioxidative genes and the production cytoprotective proteins. These cytoprotective proteins include NAD(P)H dehydrogenase [quinone] 1, which is involved in CoQ10 metabolism.

NFE2L2

Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is encoded by the gene, NFE2L2. Under non-stressful conditions, Nrf2 is regulated by proteins in the cell that degrade it quickly. Under oxidative stress, Nrf2 is not destroyed and migrates to the cell nucleus and binds to DNA. This binding of Nrf2 to promoter DNA initiates transcription of antioxidative genes and the production cytoprotective proteins. These cytoprotective proteins include NAD(P)H dehydrogenase [quinone] 1, which is involved in CoQ10 metabolism.

CAT

Catalase is the enzyme encoded by the gene, CAT, and is very abundant in all types of tissues. It converts hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen, thereby it is an important enzyme in protecting the cell from oxidative damage. Hydrogen peroxide is a harmful byproduct of many normal metabolic processes, and to prevent damage to cells and tissues, it must be quickly converted into water and oxygen. Catalase is an anti-oxidant workhorse with one of the highest turnover numbers of all enzymes; one catalase molecule can convert 5 million hydrogen peroxide molecules into water and oxygen each second. Low levels of catalase may play a role in the graying process of human hair, for if catalase levels decline, hydrogen peroxide cannot be broken down as well, allowing the hydrogen peroxide to bleach the hair before it can leave the hair follicle.

GPX1

Glutathione Peroxidase 1 is the enzyme encoded by the gene, GPX1. This enzyme plays a major role in protecting the cells against damage from oxygen radicals. It does this by reducing lipid hydroperoxides to their corresponding alcohols, and to reducing hydrogen peroxide to water. Lipid hydroperoxides are the result of the oxidative degradation of lipids, in which free radicals “steal” electrons from the lipids in cell membranes, resulting in damage to the cell membrane. Whenever, a free radical steals an electron from a lipid, it radicalizes the lipid and the cycle is continued, also known as a free radical chain reaction mechanism. This chain reaction is terminated by anti-oxidant molecules and enzymes that lock up free radicals, thereby protecting the cell membrane. If not terminated fast enough, there will be damage to the cell membranes, and since the end products of lipid peroxidation are reactive aldehydes that damage DNA, these end products are mutagenic and carcinogenic. Antioxidants that terminate this lipid peroxidation chain reaction include Vitamin E, Vitamin C, and the anti-oxidizing enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase 1.

NQO1

NAD(P)H dehydrogenase [quinone] 1 is the enzyme encoded by the gene, NQO1, that generates and maintains the active form of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in mitochondrial membrane systems and liposomes, thereby promoting CoQ10’s antioxidant activity. CoQ10 is an antioxidant made in the human body that is needed for basic cell function. CoQ10 levels decrease with age. CoQ10 has been also identified as a modulator of gene expression, inflammatory processes, and programmed cell death (apoptosis).

SOD2

Superoxide Dismutase II (SOD2) is the enzyme encoded by the gene, SOD2, and converts superoxide, an extremely toxic byproduct of cellular respiration, into hydrogen peroxide and oxygen gas. The hydrogen peroxide is further broken down into water. These actions of SOD2 reduce free-radicals and provide protection against cell death, oxidative stress, ionizing radiation, and inflammation.

NFE2L2

Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is encoded by the gene, NFE2L2. Under non-stressful conditions, Nrf2 is regulated by proteins in the cell that degrade it quickly. Under oxidative stress, Nrf2 is not destroyed and migrates to the cell nucleus and binds to DNA. This binding of Nrf2 to promoter DNA initiates transcription of antioxidative genes and the production cytoprotective proteins. These cytoprotective proteins include NAD(P)H dehydrogenase [quinone] 1, which is involved in CoQ10 metabolism.

NFE2L2

Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is encoded by the gene, NFE2L2. Under non-stressful conditions, Nrf2 is regulated by proteins in the cell that degrade it quickly. Under oxidative stress, Nrf2 is not destroyed and migrates to the cell nucleus and binds to DNA. This binding of Nrf2 to promoter DNA initiates transcription of antioxidative genes and the production cytoprotective proteins. These cytoprotective proteins include NAD(P)H dehydrogenase [quinone] 1, which is involved in CoQ10 metabolism.

CAT

Catalase is the enzyme encoded by the gene, CAT, and is very abundant in all types of tissues. It converts hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen, thereby it is an important enzyme in protecting the cell from oxidative damage. Hydrogen peroxide is a harmful byproduct of many normal metabolic processes, and to prevent damage to cells and tissues, it must be quickly converted into water and oxygen. Catalase is an anti-oxidant workhorse with one of the highest turnover numbers of all enzymes; one catalase molecule can convert 5 million hydrogen peroxide molecules into water and oxygen each second. Low levels of catalase may play a role in the graying process of human hair, for if catalase levels decline, hydrogen peroxide cannot be broken down as well, allowing the hydrogen peroxide to bleach the hair before it can leave the hair follicle.

GPX1

Glutathione Peroxidase 1 is the enzyme encoded by the gene, GPX1. This enzyme plays a major role in protecting the cells against damage from oxygen radicals. It does this by reducing lipid hydroperoxides to their corresponding alcohols, and to reducing hydrogen peroxide to water. Lipid hydroperoxides are the result of the oxidative degradation of lipids, in which free radicals “steal” electrons from the lipids in cell membranes, resulting in damage to the cell membrane. Whenever, a free radical steals an electron from a lipid, it radicalizes the lipid and the cycle is continued, also known as a free radical chain reaction mechanism. This chain reaction is terminated by anti-oxidant molecules and enzymes that lock up free radicals, thereby protecting the cell membrane. If not terminated fast enough, there will be damage to the cell membranes, and since the end products of lipid peroxidation are reactive aldehydes that damage DNA, these end products are mutagenic and carcinogenic. Antioxidants that terminate this lipid peroxidation chain reaction include Vitamin E, Vitamin C, and the anti-oxidizing enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase 1.

Skin Elasicity + Genes

MMP1

Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1) is an enzyme, encoded by the gene, MMP1, that breaks down collagen. Collagen is the main structural protein of connective tissue. Collagen is vital for skin elasticity, giving skin its firmness, suppleness, and plays a role in the constant renewal of skin cells. Over activity of MMP1 increases collagen degradation, resulting in loss of skin elasticity (firmness, suppleness, and skin cell renewal), increased wrinkling, and skin sagging. An insertion mutation in the promoter region of MMP1 results in increased expression of the enzyme, and over activity of MMP1.

IL6

Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine, encoded by the gene, IL6. IL-6 is secreted by immune system cells and adipocytes (i.e. fat cells) to stimulate an immune response, such as occurs from tissue damage, leading to inflammation. IL-6 signaling following tissue damage creates a pro-inflammatory response, including the production of the inflammatory C-reactive protein. C-reactive protein contributes to inflammation-induced tissue damage by stimulating the white blood cells to “eat” dead cells and cellular debris. Thus, over expression of IL-6 leads to increased susceptibility to tissue inflammation and subsequent skin damage.

MMP3

Matrix Metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) is an enzyme, encoded by the gene, MMP3, that breaks down extracellular matrix proteins. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of enzymes that degrade the components of the extracellular matrix. MMP3 degrades multiple extracellular matrix proteins, and additionally activates other MMPs that synergistically regulate the integrity of the extracellular matrix. MMP-3 expression is increased in response to stimuli including growth factors and cytokines. Extracellular matrix proteins are secreted by cells in order to provide structural and biochemical support to adjacent cells. The extracellular matrix regulates a cell’s dynamic behavior, serving many functions such as providing support, segregating tissues from one another, and regulating intercellular communication. Also importantly, the extracellular matrix accumulates and stores numerous cellular growth factors. Under appropriate physiological conditions, the extracellular matrix can release of these stored growth factors, allowing rapid growth factor-mediated activation of cellular activities such as cell renewal, growth, and wound healing. Over activity of MMP3 increases degradation of the extracellular matrix, resulting in loss of skin elasticity (firmness, suppleness, and skin cell renewal), increased wrinkling, and skin sagging. An insertion mutation in the promoter region of MMP3 results in increased expression of the enzyme, and over activity of MMP3.

MMP9

Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) is an enzyme, encoded by the gene, MMP9, that breaks down extracellular matrix proteins, particularly gelatin. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of enzymes that degrade the various components of the extracellular matrix. MMP9 degrades gelatin (i.e. hydrolyzed collagen) and additionally attracts and activates neutrophils (white blood cells). MMP-9 expression is increased in response to macrophage phagocytosis. Extracellular matrix proteins are secreted by cells in order to provide structural and biochemical support to adjacent cells. The extracellular matrix regulates a cell’s dynamic behavior, serving many functions such as providing support, segregating tissues from one another, and regulating intercellular communication. Also importantly, the extracellular matrix accumulates and stores numerous cellular growth factors. Under appropriate physiological conditions, the extracellular matrix can release of these stored growth factors, allowing rapid growth factor-mediated activation of cellular activities such as cell renewal, growth, and wound healing. Overactivity of MMP9 increases degradation of the extracellular matrix, resulting in loss of skin elasticity (firmness, suppleness, and skin cell renewal), increased wrinkling, and skin sagging. A SNP in the promoter region of MMP9 results in greatly increased expression of the enzyme, and resultant damaging overactivity of MMP9 via degradation of the extracellular matrix.

Skin Hydration + Genes

AQP3

Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is a protein, encoded by the gene AQP3, that forms pores in the membrane of biological cells through which water can flow more rapidly inside the cell than by diffusing through the membrane itself. Aquaporin-3 selectively conducts water molecules and glycerol in and out of the cell, while preventing the passage of ions and other solutes. AQP3 acts as a glycerol transporter in skin and plays an important role in regulating stratum corneum (the outermost dry layer of skin) and epidermal (underlying wet layer of skin) glycerol content, and as such is involved in skin hydration and wound healing. AQP3 expression in human skin is increased in response to skin stress. Reduced AQP3-dependent glycerol transport in AQP3-deficient epidermis appears to be responsible for reduced stratum corneum water content and elasticity (dry, stiff skin), as well as impaired wound healing and epidermal biosynthesis. These deficiencies in AQP3 can be corrected by glycerol replacement.

Download A Sample Skin Care Report

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Benefits of a Skin Care Report

  • Minimizes your skin’s aging based on your genetic makeup
  • Provides a more accurate and scientific selection of skin care products
  • Offers actionable information to eliminate the guesswork in treating your skin

$249.00 Read More

One Size Does Not Fit
All. Uncover Your Difference.

STEP ONE: ORDER

Start by ordering your DNA4Life Report online. We will send you the package.You will receive an email with instructions on:

  • How you will be notified that your report is ready.
  • How to retrieve your report when it is ready.

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STEP TWO: COLLECT

Our DNA Sample Collection Package includes detailed instructions on how to provide your DNA sample. Gently rub the DNA collection swabs on the inside of your cheek, and place the swabs back inside the Envelope provided.

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STEP THREE: SEND

Place the Sample Collection Envelope in the postage prepaid and pre-addressed return envelope and drop it in the United States mail back to us. It’s that easy!

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7

Only One You. Find Out What Makes You So Unique.

A piano has 88 keys. Each one of them is different. Each key represents a different musical note. When blended together, you experience the richness and fullness of what music can offer. 

The same holds true for you. You are unique. There is no one else on this earth like you. Understanding what makes you different can significantly impact your life. This is where DNA4Life can help you. 

From a genetic snapshot of your health and wellness to reports on your skins vitality, we unlock the answers to what makes you so unique. Like the music produced by the 88 keys on the piano, DNA4Life holds the key to discover what makes you so different.

What Is Your DNA Trying To Tell You?

• Optimize Your Skin’s Health & Vitality
• Improve Your Diet, Nutrition, & Exercise Routine